How to Make and Use an Herbal Muscle Liniment

Last month, I talked about making and using an Arnica oil (and at the end mentioned a liniment).

Now, lets make a liniment!

A liniment is a topical preparation that is thinner than an oil or a salve, usually made with some form of alcohol, and has a faster drying time on the skin. They can be made to be warming or cooling but in almost all forms are for external use only (remember that when labeling).

We have a fairly active family, and Oaken has some back issues from his military time, so this liniment will be warming with the purpose to be used for relieving muscles aches and frozen joints.

In this liniment we will be using:

Arnica montana - antiinflammatory and vulnerary

Calendula officinalis - antiinflammatory, vulnerary, lymphatic, warming

Ginger - antiinflammatory, circulatory stimulant

Just like with the infused oil, there aren’t exact doses for liniments, so there is no need for exact measurements. I know that people REALLY like measurements but think of this as a practice into your own intuitive medicine maker.

How to Make and Use an Herbal Muscle Liniment

Ingredients:

  • Arnica flowers

  • Calendula flowers

  • Ginger root

  • Rubbing alcohol - again, this is for external use only!

  • Mason jar with lid

To make:

Add several handfuls of Arnica flowers and Calendula flowers to the jar. Add in some ginger root (more if you want it extra warming but ginger is very heating even in small amounts so you don’t need handfuls). Cover with rubbing alcohol. Cap and label.

Freshly made herbal muscle liniment

Freshly made herbal muscle liniment

Don’t forget to label!! Note that I also marked “ext use only” to remind me to mark that on the finished label as well. Both the Arnica and the rubbing alcohol should not be used internally!

Don’t forget to label!! Note that I also marked “ext use only” to remind me to mark that on the finished label as well. Both the Arnica and the rubbing alcohol should not be used internally!


Let sit for 6-8 weeks. Strain, bottle and label.

To use:

Rub on affected areas. Avoid on broken skin and do not take internally (this is because of the Arnica, in other formulas it can be used on broken skin)!

You can also soak a rag in the liniment and place it on the skin. This can be handy for joints if you need to be up and moving but still want to use the medicine (although, if its a injury, ensure plenty of rest time for it to recover).

If you prefer a spray, you can also put this into a spray bottle. There are really so many possibilities.

You will often see liniments popular in veterinary care, especially with horses.

Do you use liniments in the home?